I-Beam Heavy Duty Cantilever Rack

I-beam cantilever racks are available in standard freestanding heights and These racks are built for the toughest, heaviest, bulkiest long sheet, stock, and parts loading.

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Detailed Description for I-Beam Heavy Duty Cantilever Rack

I-beam cantilever racks are available in standard freestanding heights and These racks are built for the toughest, heaviest, bulkiest long sheet, stock, and parts loading.

·         Columns, arms and bases are constructed of I-beam structural steel with a 50,000 psi minimum yield

·         Arms and bases are secured to columns with grade 5 bolted connections

·         I-beam cantilever racks are ready for heavy-duty applications with low maintenance

·         Starter units are capable of stand-alone use

·         Adder units include arms, brackets and one upright and must be connected to another unit

How to design your cantilever rack system

    1. Determine the number and spacing of support arms using enough arms to prevent deflection of the load: 
      1. Number of arms required = number of wood blocks needed to support load without deflection 
        Test for deflection:
        • place wood blocks evenly spaced on the floor under the load, starting with 2 wood blocks 
        • add blocks at evenly spaced intervals under the load, until the load no longer deflects (or sags between wood blocks)
      2. Arm capacity required = Load weight  /  number of wood blocks needed  (2 blocks mean arm capacity required is 1/2 the load weight, 3 blocks equal 1/3 the load weight, etc.)
      3. Optimal width between uprights  =  load length  /  by the number of block supports needed (2 blocks means the centerpoint between uprights is 1/2 the load length, 3 blocks mean the uprights must be positioned at intervals equal to 1/3 of the load length, etc.) 
        • Correct design has product overhang at the end of the rack by 1/2 of the optimal upright width distance

    2. Determine the arm length, which is:
      1. equal to the load depth
      2. and load does not hang over the end of the arm


    3. Determine the optimal upright height beginning with the base height:
      Base Height
      +  number of storage levels x load height 
      +  number of arm levels x arm height at widest point
      +  number of storage levels x handling clearance (4" - 6") 
      =  upright height
      • Be mindful your total height is within ceiling height and forklift height limits
      • Your topmost arm level must be below the upright height top
      • Contact us for current arm and base dimensions

    4. Determine capacities needed: 
      1. Arm capacity  =  Load weight  /  number of arms per level (assuming load is to be evenly distributed)
      2. Upright capacity  =  Number of arms per side  x  load per arm
        • Load on base is not included in capacity



  1. Brace lengths equal the horizontal distance on center between uprights 
      • Bracing is sold by the piece, not sets

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